Community Gardeners Less Likely To Be Overweight 22 Apr 2013 People who are involved in community gardening tend to have a considerably lower body mass index than their non-gardening counterparts, a team from the University of Utah reported in theAmerican Journal of Public Health. Previous studies had shown that community gardeners provide both nutritional and social benefits to neighborhoods, lead author CathleenZick explained. “But until now, we did not have data to show a measurable health benefit for those who use the gardens.” The Utah team used BMI (body mass index) to measure how close or far people were to their ideal body weight.

50 Shades of Gluten (Intolerance) Celiac disease is characterized by an immune response to a specific epitope of gliadin (alpha-gliadin) and a specific type of transglutaminase (tTG-2). But we now know that people can (and do) react to several other components of wheat and gluten — including other epitopes of gliadin (beta, gamma, omega), glutenin, WGA and deamidated gliadin — as well as other types of transglutaminase, including type 3 (primarily found in the skin) and type 6 (primarily found in the brain). This is a huge problem because conventional lab testing for CD and of gluten intolerance only screens for antibodies to alpha-gliadin and transglutaminase-2. If you’re reacting to any other fractions of the wheat protein (e.g., beta-gliadin, gamma-gliadin or omega-gliadin), or any other types of transglutaminase (e.g., type 3 or type 6), you’ll test negative for CD and gluten intolerance no matter how severely you’re reacting to wheat. Read More…

By MICHAEL MOSS Published: February 20, 2013   On the evening of April 8, 1999, a long line of Town Cars and taxis pulled up to the Minneapolis headquarters of Pillsbury and discharged 11 men who controlled America’s largest food companies. Nestlé was in attendance, as were Kraft and Nabisco, General Mills and Procter & Gamble, Coca-Cola and Mars. Rivals any other day, the C.E.O.’s and company presidents had come together for a rare, private meeting. On the agenda was one item: the emerging obesity epidemic and how to deal with it. While the atmosphere was cordial, the men assembled were hardly friends. Their stature was defined by their skill in fighting one another for what they called “stomach share” — the amount of digestive space that any one company’s brand can grab from the competition.       

The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – How Antioxidants Really Protect Against Stroke and Dementia – By Jaimie Dalessio – (Thursday, February 21, 2013) – The protective power of antioxidants against stroke and dementia may have less to do with your total dietary intake of antioxidants and more to do with the specific foods that contribute to your antioxidant level, new research suggests. Researchers from Harvard Medical School in Boston and Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam in the Netherlands analyzed health and dietary information on 5,395 people aged 55 and older who were part of the long-term Rotterdam Study of medical conditions and other factors in older adults.

Courtesy of my brilliant and slightly zany colleague in Denver, CO, Dr. Jacob Schor While I’m sitting here thinking about chocolate, I should take a moment or two and tell you about a recent paper that was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Put simply, it tells us that frequent chocolate consumption is associated with lower BMI.

And why eating Alaskan salmon is the best way to get it! Courtesy of Sandro Lane, owner, Alaska Protein Recovery — the only fish oil I recommend to my patients. Fish oil can come in three main forms:

Inner Peace Reduces Anxiety 1. Be good to yourself. This is not selfish. It’s the foundation for a more peaceful world. 2. Breathe. Deep, slow breathing creates an ‘alpha’ state, which is an inwardly focused, relaxed, receptive awareness of reality. Allow the time daily for deep breathing and self-reflection. 3. Take care of your body. Move every day. Avoid alcohol, caffeine and junk food. Drink 1/4 your weight (pounds) in ounces of water daily. Always drink before eating, and never during meals. Choose vibrant, fresh, organic foods. 4. Honor your emotions. Acknowledge them, allow them, name them. Express them in a way that is not harmful to yourself or others. For example, write a letter or sing your pain instead of consuming sugar, alcohol or other drugs. 5. Create fun, loving relationships. Avoid judgment. 6. You get what you think about most. Think positively. Release negative emotions. Feel gratitude. Make a list of 5 reasons you feel grateful, every morning. Resources: www.HealthJourney.com www.BrainSync.com www.PathofLight.com Belleruth, Naparstek, “Meditation for Relaxation & Wellness” Burne, Rhonda, “The Secret” Hay, Louise L, “You Can...

VITAMIN D MAY BOOST HEART FAILURE SURVIVAL RATES: A study has found that heart failure patients with reduced levels of vitamin D have lower rates of survival than patients with normal vitamin D levels. As a result, researchers suggest that a low intake of vitamin D may be a factor in the development, and outcome, of heart failure. Vitamin D is produced by the skin when it is exposed to the natural ultra violet-B, or UV-B, radiation from the sun. Most tissues and cells have a vitamin D receptor; and evidence suggests vitamin D reduces the risks of several chronic illnesses such as common cancers, autoimmune diseases, kidney diseases, chronic infectious diseases, high blood pressure and apparently, heart failure. The study team described the evidence of a protective effect from vitamin D as “compelling,” and recommended that heart failure patients should be advised to take vitamin D supplements and eat oily fish or eggs. The study was presented August 31, 2010 at the annual congress of the European Society Cardiology. It has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal....

When I herniated a lumbar disc a few years ago, I had a steep learning curve about how to treat this condition. I learned a lot about how to treat, and prevent further harm, to a damaged low back.