published in the March 8, 2008 issue of New Scientist Magazine by Harvard researcher Paula J. Caplan Walk down any street in America and you’ll see the effects of the “obesity epidemic”. Two-thirds of adults, more than 130 million people, are now considered overweight, and nearly half of these are classified as obese.

Wheat seems to be the most “irritating” of the gluten-containing grains, and some folks are only wheat sensitive, without having the full-blown problem of gluten intolerance.  Total gluten sensitivity (celiac disease, or celiac “sprue”) has many faces, and the most well-known are various forms of gastro-intestinal distress:  usually diarrhea, but occasionally constipation, oral or gastric ulcers, a shiny raw-feeling tongue (glossitis), nausea after eating, and even vomiting.  General symptoms can includes “malaise” which mean feeling unwell, also weakness, unexplained weight loss, failure to grow (in children) and blunting of the fingertips (clubbing).  The skin can become itchy, or develop lots of tiny capillary breaks, and herpes-like blisters may occur, often in the mouth. Vitamin deficiencies are common with celiac disease: especially the B vitamins (lack of which cause an easy stress response, and tingling, then numbing of the extremities), and also the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K can be in short supply.  Bone density can be reduced because celiac disease causes calcium malabsorption.  What is going on in true celiac disease is that part of the gluten molecule...

Many of us have been incited to concern, even fear,  about cholesterol levels.  There has been an enormous media and medical push to reduce cholesterol levels in the past two decades. 

If you are considering a 5 day “spring cleanse” here is a shopping list and recipes for 5 days of fresh juice — which, along with water, will be all you “eat” for those 5 wonderful days. If your bloodtype is O or B and you typically require at least 50 grams of protein daily for optimal wellbeing, you may consider adding home-made “bone broth” using an organic chicken carcass, celery, onions, garlic, ginger, etc. or a similar clear broth from simmering a fresh fish head.  For making juice from the fresh organic produce I like the good old Champion juicer, also the “Juiceman” juicer, but there are many good ones out there. Shopping list: 25 pound bag of #2 organic carrots (not the prettiest, but perfect for juicing) 10 pound of organic beets 10 packets of organic celery stalks 10 pounds of organic apples 5 pounds of organic pears 2 pineapples cilantro, basil, parsley, mint, ginger, garlic, lemons for juicing Day One: morning drink: 4 apples, 1 pear, a little basil and a little ginger noon and evening drinks:...

Would you benefit from cleansing? Yes, if you: Smoke Are regularly exposed to environmental toxins Drink less than a litre of water daily Drink soda pop, coffee or alcohol Eat processed foods such as white flour baked goods and candy Crave junk food Are tired, constipated, bloated and lack focus Have sticky or malodorous bowel movements Have pasty skin or dark circles under your eyes Have blood sugar problems Have unstable emotions Have unsatisfactory libido or sleep Are over or under-weight Use prescription or recreational drugs regularly If you peruse natural health news, you certainly have read the word “detox” lately.  You may have heard about how “body burden” of unnatural chemicals is higher than ever before. Industrial run-off into our rivers, pharmaceutical pollution flushed down toilets, burning fossil fuels belching into the air, fake food, plastic everywhere — all of this and more comprises an enormous burden for our internal self-cleansing systems. The amazing human body has several mechanisms by which to rid itself of non-nutrients which come in daily through our nose and mouth. We process food across...

The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association have released new guidelines for physical activity that recommend that healthy adults ages 18 to 65 exercise a minimum of five days per week in order to promote health and prevent disease.

There are many approaches to weight loss; it is a multi-million dollar industry in our land of plenty. The bottom line is to eat fewer calories than you expend daily, but not drastically fewer, until you’re happy with how you fit into your clothes, then resume a diet and exercise program that will maintain the desired weight. You can dress up weight loss with grapefruits, or cabbage stew, or Hoodia, but really, the only thing that works is to burn more calories than you’re eating. Regular, preferably daily, exercise is a must; and a brisk 45-minute walk is a terrific choice.Make sure to commit to a movement program that you enjoy.Exercise not only burns calories, but gets you away from the fridge, stimulates blood flow, improves tissue oxygenation and the overall sense of well-being, and promotes lymphatic drainage which will help rid the body of toxins.Dean Ornish, MD (new age cardiologist) says “Walk your dog every day, even if you don’t have one.”A basic comprehensive detox program is very helpful with weight loss.Drink plenty of fresh, pure water. At least...

Q: Why Do I Crave Foods That Are “Bad” For Me? A: This is a big question. Part of the answer involves understanding the relationship between your individual digestive system and the wide variety of food choices out there. Much of what passes for “food” has not even been grown in the ground. Start with this: eat real food. Eat food that HAS grown in the ground, optimally in certified organic soil, and choose food that grew there in the good earth not too long ago. Each person has a unique relationship with food depending on various factors. For example, family background. How was food presented to you as a child? Was candy given as a bribe or treat? Food choices would ideally also be predicated on blootype. Also, consider your caloric requirements: how much do you exercise, are you mostly sedentary during the day, is your day-to-day work highly mentally demanding? When you crave a certain food, and it’s a whole food (such as a juicy ripe peach) and when you eat that food and feel good and satisfied,...

Q: I am trying to eat right and stay healthy, but should I include eggs in my diet or are they bad for me? A: I am personally a great fan of eggs (including fish eggs), free-range of course.  They are a perfect protein, containing all eight essential amino acids.  They are replete with healthy, mono-unsaturated and essential fatty acids.  The fats in eggs are “emulsified” (broken down) in the liver by the lecithin provided by the very same egg.  This is why eggs do NOT raise “bad” cholesterol, contrary to popular opinion. Lecithin helps prevent kidney and liver damage and slows aging. Lecithin is a precursor to the “feed and breed” (parasympathetic) moeity of our central nervous system function — in contrast to the adrenaline-driven “fight or flight” (sympathetic) response.  So, eggs can help bust stress.  Plus, eggs are one of the best natural sources of Vitamin D — your liquid sunshine and bone builder.  The health benefits of Vitamin D (way beyond just helping calcium absorption) are just beginning to be widely appreciated.  Vitamin D is currently being...