The only portals of entry are the nostrils and mouth/throat. In a global epidemic of this nature, it’s almost impossible to avoid coming into contact with H1N1 in spite of all precautions.  Contact with H1N1 is not so much of a problem as is proliferation of the virus.

http://www.newyorker.com/talk/comment/2009/10/12/091012taco_talk_specter I agree with a good amount of this article EXCEPT the implication at the end that one should receive the vaccine.  My husband had the swine flu 2 weeks ago.  It was uncomfortable for a few days, but not a big deal.  The more relevant concern about the vaccine, and flu shots in general, is that they do NOT change the mortality nor mordibity based on analysis of many decades of annual influenza episodes.  See an earlier post about vaccines not preventing flu.  In other words, since flu shots became readily available, the only entities to reliably benefit are the vaccine manufacturers. Vaccines have not changed the course of seasonal flus.  Additionally, I have personally experienced, as well as witnessed in numerous patients, becoming quite ill with the flu directly after receiving a flu shot.  I only got one, many years ago.  That was my last!  The only time I will recommend a flu shot is to an elderely, immuno-compromised person especially if they need to be hospitalized or institutionalized.  In just about any other situation, in my opinion,...