In response to NYTimes columnist David Leonhardt published March 10, 2020 about 7 steps to minimize risk of spreading corona virus (COVID-10), who asked “Did I miss anything?” March 11, 2020 Hi Mr Leonhardt Thanks for asking. I have been a primary care doc for nearly 30 years (in Juneau Alaska).  Did you know that our endogenous anti-viral is FEVER? https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2013.2570?fbclid=IwAR2fUpjtOWW2nbeegsqK535uLj0ywwdtzq0EgonfRfPWTghmfKij8gFldVc& Also https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2951171/?fbclid=IwAR2WTSgftKKaqiz685EtWNoua_OC2kcQ-GK80IabyD7ovTLpyZ8M9_C1vIc#__sec14title Humans capable of mounting an appropriate immune response develop a fever when exposed to viral infections.  Viruses are tiny, as you know, and do their dirty work inside cells.  As opposed to bacteria, which are much larger and infect the space outside our cells, typically producing snot and phlegm and the like (mucus mixed with spent white blood cells).  The fact that the virus may abate with warmer weather has gotten some airplay but the deeper message is not getting across: viruses dislike heat.  Most viruses cannot survive in temperatures above say 103 degrees F.  I have instructed all my patients, besides assiduous prolonged hand washing and keeping fingers away from the “danger triangle” of eyes, nose...

Ready for a spring cleanse?  Here comes the the 2020 virtual version; a collaboration with Dr. Emily Kane and YOU.  This month-long, self-care commitment will set you up for the graceful aging that you know is within reach.  Join with wellness enthusiasts and optimal health seekers to reboot.  The group format will help us stay committed.  The individual session with me will help to personalize your process.  My aim is to offer durable advice to help you regain and/or maintain optimal WELLNESS.  Dates: April 14 through May 12 via ZOOM.  This will be fun! Format: 5 interactive lectures with Dr. Kane, on Tuesdays from 3-4 PM starting April 14 through May 12.   Location: via ZOOM on your computer! Curriculum: Classes will focus on finding your best diet, improving sleep quality, sticking with moving your body daily, skin brushing, home hydrotherapy, and much more. You will learn to apply simple self-health tips with a special focus on clearing or preventing viral infections.  Hint: viruses dislike heat — so you need to sweat! Cost: $200: $65 for 5 lectures, $20 for urine pH...

http://www.medscape.com/ http://www.medscape.com/ http://www.medscape.com/ Hot off the press new protocol for improving cognitive function and reversing many measurable parameters of  mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the precursor to early dementia and eventually Alzheimer’s, which until now has been considered an irreversible disease.  No drugs have worked.  The “new protocol” (book will be published in the spring, by Dr. Dale Bredesen) states that our brains make amyloid to PROTECT against toxic insults, which are the actual cause of decay of cognitive function.  Dr. Bredesen talks about 3 types of Alzheimer’s, which has been borne out by many meta-analyses. 

September 10, 2012, NY Times Popular Antibiotics May Carry Serious Side Effects By JANE E. BRODY Antibiotics are important drugs, often restoring health and even saving lives. But like all drugs, they can have unwanted and serious side effects, some of which may not become apparent until many thousands of patients have been treated.

ABNORMAL SLEEP PERIODS INCREASE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK: A study has shown that, even among healthy people, those who regularly get five hours or less sleep a night have more than double the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Also, people who regularly get nine or more hours of sleep a night have a greater than fifty percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Perhaps more surprising, people who get six or eight hours sleep also have a higher – but far less dramatic – increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The study advised that seven hours sleep per night, not six or eight or anything more extreme, was the ideal regular sleep period for cardiovascular health. But how could sleep period affect heart health? The researchers suggested that shorter sleep times can cause “impaired glucose tolerance, reduced insulin sensitivity, increased sympathetic [nerve] activity and elevated blood pressure, all of which increase the risk of hardening of the arteries. And longer sleep duration may be related to an underlying sleep-related breathing disorder or poor sleep quality. The study was published in the August 1, 2010...

The only portals of entry are the nostrils and mouth/throat. In a global epidemic of this nature, it’s almost impossible to avoid coming into contact with H1N1 in spite of all precautions.  Contact with H1N1 is not so much of a problem as is proliferation of the virus.

  • 1
  • 2