By MICHAEL MOSS Published: February 20, 2013   On the evening of April 8, 1999, a long line of Town Cars and taxis pulled up to the Minneapolis headquarters of Pillsbury and discharged 11 men who controlled America’s largest food companies. Nestlé was in attendance, as were Kraft and Nabisco, General Mills and Procter & Gamble, Coca-Cola and Mars. Rivals any other day, the C.E.O.’s and company presidents had come together for a rare, private meeting. On the agenda was one item: the emerging obesity epidemic and how to deal with it. While the atmosphere was cordial, the men assembled were hardly friends. Their stature was defined by their skill in fighting one another for what they called “stomach share” — the amount of digestive space that any one company’s brand can grab from the competition.       

Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – 6 Foods That Fight Pain – By Grandparents.com – (Friday, March 1, 2013) When you get out of bed in the morning do you make a sort of “oyyyyyyy…aaaagggh” groan that goes with an achy pain in your back and knees? Welcome to the world of getting older. (Your first impulse might be to take some ibuprofen. Recent studies, however, have shown a possible link between longterm-use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) and increased risk of heart disease and gastrointestinal bleeding–so talk to your doctor.)  What you can do right now is incorporate certain foods into your diet that have been shown to reduce pain and may take away some of that achy feeling.

This has some good info, however if you do eat tuna, make sure it’s young tuna (Carvalho Tuna out of the Portland OR area provides this) because the old tuna are full of mercury.  Also “beets” is misspelled as “beats” in the article and these MUST be organic.  Most of the white sugar available in the US is made from GMO beets.  That’s right.  GMO sugar.  Check the preview for “Genetic Roulette” on youtube.com:  A chilling and importunate expose of Monsanto’s monster. The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) –

NY Daily News (NY) – Does eating junk food make your skin break out? Diet may help control acne after all, say researchers – By Tracy Miller – (Wednesday, February 20, 2013) – For decades, the connection between diet and acne has been dismissed as an old wives’ tale. But now researchers are revisiting the subject — and a new review of studies finds evidence that what you eat may have a bearing on the severity of your acne after all. About 17 million Americans, and 80 to 90 percent of adolescents, experience acne, according to the paper, which appears in the March issue of the Journal of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – The Many Health Benefits of Avocado – By Dr. Joseph Mercola – (Tuesday, February 19, 2013) –   You probably know that avocados are an excellent source of healthful fats, but this whole food may also have other unique health benefits. To learn more, the Hass Avocado Board (HAB) is supporting clinical research to investigate various health effects of avocado consumption, particularly its benefits for cardiovascular disease, weight management, diabetes, and its ability to enhance your body’s absorption of nutrients.   The first of these HAB-supported studies was published in November 2012. The small UCLA-led pilot study found that eating one-half of a fresh medium Hass avocado with a hamburger (made with 90 percent lean beef) significantly inhibited the production of the inflammatory compound Interleukin-6 (IL-6) compared to eating a burger without fresh avocado.

new research suggests yes, so moms, keep your minds open here: The Philadelphia Inquirer (philly.com) – Can giving babies solids sooner prevent food allergies? – By Christopher C. Chang, M.D., Ph.D. – (Tuesday, February 12, 2013) –   Rice cereal first and then vegetables? What about fruit? I get these questions often from my patients. The timing of when to introduce solid foods to infants can be confusing for parents, and the recommendations can vary slightly from doctor to doctor.   The research is ongoing, but there is a growing body of evidence which suggest introducing solid foods early may increase tolerance and reduce incidence of allergies.  

The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – Gut Bacteria and Childhood Eczema –  Leonard Smith MD – (Monday, February 11, 2013)   Gut bacterial balance affects many different areas of health, but one of the most important to consider is the establishment of healthy gut bacterial balance during infancy. This is a topic Brenda Watson and I have covered many times. Brenda has blogged on this topic a few times, and we cover it in our bookThe Road to Perfect Health.   Healthy gut balance during early life is associated with protection against a range of health conditions, most notably the atopic diseases of childhood — asthma, eczema, and allergies. [1] Gut balance during infancy is dependent on factors such as mode of delivery, diet, and administration of probiotics or antibiotics. This early gut microbial development primes immune function that can have life-long effects on health.

five basic ideas (see also previous post featuring Dr. Burkitt): 1) more fiber (good quality bread, celery, apples, hot oatmeal, all leafy vegetables, berries) 2) less fat in particular less (or zero) animal fat 3) less (or zero) sugar 4) less salt 5) no processed foods   It’s not just about weight or looking good in jeans.  It’s about the whole enchillada from macro (planetary health) to micro (the bugs that co-exist with you your whole life in your tube).  Check out this brief excerpt from an upcoming book about the human biome and how drastically it has changed (due to poor diet) in the past 100 years: Forthcoming book by the folks at Human Food Project. Click Here if you would like to receive a notice when this book becomes available. So what should you eat to improve the diversity and possible resilience of your gut microbiome to reduce the risk to invading pathogens, unnecessary inflammation, leaky gut and so forth?  Nobody really knows for sure and the answer is likely different for different age groups and populations.  But at...

Homo sapiens evolved in Africa as a hairless ape. That creature spent LOTS of time outside, with a prodigious amount of skin exposure in a nice sunny environment. Today homo sapiens is largely an indoor mammal, and typically covers up a good deal of skin when venturing outside. Even when in a relaxed stance, say on a beach vacation, gobs of sunscreen is applied. This all adds up to much less Vitamin D synthesis happening in the skin cells.