new research suggests yes, so moms, keep your minds open here: The Philadelphia Inquirer (philly.com) – Can giving babies solids sooner prevent food allergies? – By Christopher C. Chang, M.D., Ph.D. – (Tuesday, February 12, 2013) –   Rice cereal first and then vegetables? What about fruit? I get these questions often from my patients. The timing of when to introduce solid foods to infants can be confusing for parents, and the recommendations can vary slightly from doctor to doctor.   The research is ongoing, but there is a growing body of evidence which suggest introducing solid foods early may increase tolerance and reduce incidence of allergies.  

The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – Gut Bacteria and Childhood Eczema –  Leonard Smith MD – (Monday, February 11, 2013)   Gut bacterial balance affects many different areas of health, but one of the most important to consider is the establishment of healthy gut bacterial balance during infancy. This is a topic Brenda Watson and I have covered many times. Brenda has blogged on this topic a few times, and we cover it in our bookThe Road to Perfect Health.   Healthy gut balance during early life is associated with protection against a range of health conditions, most notably the atopic diseases of childhood — asthma, eczema, and allergies. [1] Gut balance during infancy is dependent on factors such as mode of delivery, diet, and administration of probiotics or antibiotics. This early gut microbial development primes immune function that can have life-long effects on health.

five basic ideas (see also previous post featuring Dr. Burkitt): 1) more fiber (good quality bread, celery, apples, hot oatmeal, all leafy vegetables, berries) 2) less fat in particular less (or zero) animal fat 3) less (or zero) sugar 4) less salt 5) no processed foods   It’s not just about weight or looking good in jeans.  It’s about the whole enchillada from macro (planetary health) to micro (the bugs that co-exist with you your whole life in your tube).  Check out this brief excerpt from an upcoming book about the human biome and how drastically it has changed (due to poor diet) in the past 100 years: Forthcoming book by the folks at Human Food Project. Click Here if you would like to receive a notice when this book becomes available. So what should you eat to improve the diversity and possible resilience of your gut microbiome to reduce the risk to invading pathogens, unnecessary inflammation, leaky gut and so forth?  Nobody really knows for sure and the answer is likely different for different age groups and populations.  But at...

Homo sapiens evolved in Africa as a hairless ape. That creature spent LOTS of time outside, with a prodigious amount of skin exposure in a nice sunny environment. Today homo sapiens is largely an indoor mammal, and typically covers up a good deal of skin when venturing outside. Even when in a relaxed stance, say on a beach vacation, gobs of sunscreen is applied. This all adds up to much less Vitamin D synthesis happening in the skin cells.

Homo sapiens evolved in Africa as a hairless ape. That creature spent LOTS of time outside, with a prodigious amount of skin exposure in a nice sunny environment. Today homo sapiens is largely an indoor mammal, and typically covers up a good deal of skin when venturing outside. Often when in a relaxed stance, say on a beach vacation, gobs of sunscreen is applied. This all adds up to much less Vitamin D synthesis happening in the skin cells. Hairless ape was designed to receive a lot of Vitamin D. The sun emits both UV-A (responsible for most melanomas) and UV-B which does not penetrate clouds or through glass and is only “full strength” at mid-day. UV-B is the ray needed to synthesize Vit D, whereas UV-A is the “tanning” frequency in tanning salons and does not stimulate much Vit D production. People who are extremely deficient in Vitamin D (less than 12 ng/mL) will respond rapidly to real sun exposure, and serum levels rise quickly. People who are marginally deficient (between 30 and 50 ng/mL) achieve optimal levels (50-80...

Apparently if you stay overweight beyond middle age (40 something) your risk of losing your mind increases. Read on. and from the New York Times, August 24, 2012 Debunking the Hunter-Gatherer Workout

Courtesy of my brilliant and slightly zany colleague in Denver, CO, Dr. Jacob Schor While I’m sitting here thinking about chocolate, I should take a moment or two and tell you about a recent paper that was published in the Archives of Internal Medicine. Put simply, it tells us that frequent chocolate consumption is associated with lower BMI.

And why eating Alaskan salmon is the best way to get it! Courtesy of Sandro Lane, owner, Alaska Protein Recovery — the only fish oil I recommend to my patients. Fish oil can come in three main forms:

Inner Peace Reduces Anxiety 1. Be good to yourself. This is not selfish. It’s the foundation for a more peaceful world. 2. Breathe. Deep, slow breathing creates an ‘alpha’ state, which is an inwardly focused, relaxed, receptive awareness of reality. Allow the time daily for deep breathing and self-reflection. 3. Take care of your body. Move every day. Avoid alcohol, caffeine and junk food. Drink 1/4 your weight (pounds) in ounces of water daily. Always drink before eating, and never during meals. Choose vibrant, fresh, organic foods. 4. Honor your emotions. Acknowledge them, allow them, name them. Express them in a way that is not harmful to yourself or others. For example, write a letter or sing your pain instead of consuming sugar, alcohol or other drugs. 5. Create fun, loving relationships. Avoid judgment. 6. You get what you think about most. Think positively. Release negative emotions. Feel gratitude. Make a list of 5 reasons you feel grateful, every morning. Resources: www.HealthJourney.com www.BrainSync.com www.PathofLight.com Belleruth, Naparstek, “Meditation for Relaxation & Wellness” Burne, Rhonda, “The Secret” Hay, Louise L, “You Can...