The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – Gut Bacteria and Childhood Eczema –  Leonard Smith MD – (Monday, February 11, 2013)   Gut bacterial balance affects many different areas of health, but one of the most important to consider is the establishment of healthy gut bacterial balance during infancy. This is a topic Brenda Watson and I have covered many times. Brenda has blogged on this topic a few times, and we cover it in our bookThe Road to Perfect Health.   Healthy gut balance during early life is associated with protection against a range of health conditions, most notably the atopic diseases of childhood — asthma, eczema, and allergies. [1] Gut balance during infancy is dependent on factors such as mode of delivery, diet, and administration of probiotics or antibiotics. This early gut microbial development primes immune function that can have life-long effects on health.

five basic ideas (see also previous post featuring Dr. Burkitt): 1) more fiber (good quality bread, celery, apples, hot oatmeal, all leafy vegetables, berries) 2) less fat in particular less (or zero) animal fat 3) less (or zero) sugar 4) less salt 5) no processed foods   It’s not just about weight or looking good in jeans.  It’s about the whole enchillada from macro (planetary health) to micro (the bugs that co-exist with you your whole life in your tube).  Check out this brief excerpt from an upcoming book about the human biome and how drastically it has changed (due to poor diet) in the past 100 years: Forthcoming book by the folks at Human Food Project. Click Here if you would like to receive a notice when this book becomes available. So what should you eat to improve the diversity and possible resilience of your gut microbiome to reduce the risk to invading pathogens, unnecessary inflammation, leaky gut and so forth?  Nobody really knows for sure and the answer is likely different for different age groups and populations.  But at...

Nature is very efficient.  Good designs, no waste.  The purpose of the gallbladder is to store a small repository of bile, which serves many important functions.  Bile requires a good deal of energy and biological resources to produce in the body.  It is vigorously recycled.  It is what makes the color of a healthy stool dark brown.  The main purpose of bile is to break down fat into absorbable components, namely essential fatty acids. 

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