http://www.medscape.com/ http://www.medscape.com/ http://www.medscape.com/ Hot off the press new protocol for improving cognitive function and reversing many measurable parameters of  mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the precursor to early dementia and eventually Alzheimer’s, which until now has been considered an irreversible disease.  No drugs have worked.  The “new protocol” (book will be published in the spring, by Dr. Dale Bredesen) states that our brains make amyloid to PROTECT against toxic insults, which are the actual cause of decay of cognitive function.  Dr. Bredesen talks about 3 types of Alzheimer’s, which has been borne out by many meta-analyses. 

What is the most fundamental nutrient? It’s oxygen. Think about it. You can go 40 days or so without food. You can go maybe 3-4 days without water. But you can’t go 3-4 minutes without oxygen. There are many ways to use oxygen to enhance health and vitality, including the most obvious: aerobic exercise. Exercise increases “oxygen utilization” which ultimately drives the myriad enzyme systems in the body to produce more energy (ATP).

Brain Training to Keep Dementia at Bay: Buyer Beware Deborah Brauser November 21, 2014 MEDSCAPE Editors’ Recommendations Computer Training May Keep Older Brains Sharp Music Therapy Brings Dementia Patients ‘Back to Life’ Growing evidence suggests brain training may help maintain cognition and lower dementia risk, resulting in the rise of a billion dollar brain training industry. However, new research examining the efficacy of such programs suggests not all are created equal and that it may be a case of buyer beware. A meta-analysis of 51 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that included more than 4800 older participants showed that group-based brain training under the supervision of a trainer was significantly more effective for overall cognition, memory, and processing speed than self-directed, home-based training programs. “Our results send a key message to the public. They show that brain training carried out in a center can improve cognition in older adults, but commercial products promoted for solo training use at home just don’t work. There are better ways to spend your time and money,” senior author Michael Valenzuala, PhD, associate professor and leader...

from self-proclaimed “Geek Tim” For years, I listened to Limbaugh on my way to work, and to “Air America” on my way from work, specifically so I could ‘compare and contrast’.  In my opinion, the popularity difference is because they relate to their audience differently. Julia Sweeney has a great line that “listening to NPR is like listening to your mother telling you to clean your room”. •We have a gas crisis?  It would help if you used mass transit more •We have an education crisis?  It would help if you read to your kids more •We have a health care crisis?  If you exercised more and ate better, we wouldn’t have such a demand on the system.  Coming up next: 3 ways you can add kale to your daily diet. •Country <X> isn’t doing what we want?  If you knew more about their history, you’d understand why.  Coming up next: an interview with a prominent exile. The typical framing of the typical problem is about what you can/should do to help things get better.   On the other hand,...

New research is revealing something remarkable about why the body sweats. Beyond its obvious role in regulating body temperature, sweating has been found to facilitate the elimination of accumulated heavy metals and petrochemicals, indicating that if we want to be healthy we should put regular effort into doing more sweating.  Sweating has long been known as a source of bodily, if not also spiritual “cleansing.” But until recently, very little ‘scientific’ confirmation existed proving that using heat and/or exercise to facilitate perspiration-induced detoxification actually works the way that many natural health advocates claim.

First published in December 2012 issue of Better Nutrition Q: Hi Doctor Em!  Have you heard of earthing? A: Yes,”earthing” is a relatively new medical idea, with some impressive research from various disciplines behind it — but it’s as old as the hills.  “Earthing” means connecting with the earth — literally.  Humans have done this for thousands of years by walking barefoot on the ground.  The relatively new convention of walking with shoes, particularly rubber or plastic-soled shoes, has disconnected us from the benefits of the Earth’s electromagnetic field.  The planet herself gives out a frequency of about 10 hertz, which was discerned at the Max Planck Institute in the 1960s. 

Even though muscle is heavier than fat, and exercise greatly stimulates appetite, no health improvement or weight loss program will ultimately succeed without focused toning. This is because muscle is hugely metabolically active tissue and uses up close to 80% of our glucose requirements. In general, I favor low carb (and no refined carb) diets,

Q: I take one regular aspirin a day and a small dose of a beta blocker to regulate the electrical impulses in my heart.  I’ve been told that these medicines are compromising my intestinal and liver function.  I’d like to discontinue the pharmaceuticals completely.  Is that possible to do safely? Jenny M-Y, Bellingham WA A: Hi Jenny, I’m pleased you are interested in natural approaches to health care.  You bring up several important issues.  First, while you can most likely safely discontinue aspirin immediately, you need to wean off the beta-blocker more slowly. Beta-blockers are the “first generation” of drugs used mostly to control high blood pressure, because they block the “beta-adrenergic”, or adrenaline, receptors in the heart tissue.  Adrenaline is an extremely potent vasoconstrictor, so blocking adrenaline means the tissue stays more relaxed (not constricting).  In your case, the beta-blocker is being used to regulate the electrical impulses, which is a different story.  The heart is an amazing organ with both electrical and plumbing functions.  The plumbing is of course the pumping of the oxygenated blood around the body.  Each...

For years, physicians and scientists have been aware that statins, the most widely prescribed drugs in the world, can cause muscle aches and fatigue in some patients. What many people don’t know is that these side effects are especially pronounced in people who exercise. To learn more about the effect statins have on exercising muscles, scientists in Strasbourg, France, recently gave the cholesterol-lowering drug Lipitor to a group of rats for two weeks, while a separate control group was not medicated. Some of the rats from both groups ran on little treadmills until they were exhausted. It was immediately obvious that the medicated animals couldn’t run as far. They became exhausted much earlier than the rats that had not been given statins. The differences were even more striking at a cellular level. When the scientists studied muscle tissues, they found that oxidative stress, a measure of possible cell damage, was increased by 60 percent in sedentary animals receiving statins, compared with the unmedicated control group. The effect was magnified in the runners, whose cells showed 226 percent more oxidative stress...