from a colleague: For my bulletproof turmeric, I have used coconut oil, butter, honey, and spices to optimize digest and the absorption of curcumin.  Curcumin is notoriously difficult to absorb, but fats and spices, particularly the black pepper in the garam masala, greatly increase our absorption of curcumin into the blood stream.  1 cup water  1 tsp turmeric (optionally add one capsule of curcumin 95% extract)  ¼ tsp garam masala  1 tsp maca (optional, but delicious)  1 Tbs grass fed butter  1 Tbs coconut oil or MCT oil  1 tsp honey  Simmer water with turmeric and garam masala for 10 minutes.  Strain through a fine mesh strainer.  Add remaining ingredients and whirl in blender or with immersion blender until foamy.      

This has some good info, however if you do eat tuna, make sure it’s young tuna (Carvalho Tuna out of the Portland OR area provides this) because the old tuna are full of mercury.  Also “beets” is misspelled as “beats” in the article and these MUST be organic.  Most of the white sugar available in the US is made from GMO beets.  That’s right.  GMO sugar.  Check the preview for “Genetic Roulette” on youtube.com:  A chilling and importunate expose of Monsanto’s monster. The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) –

new research suggests yes, so moms, keep your minds open here: The Philadelphia Inquirer (philly.com) – Can giving babies solids sooner prevent food allergies? – By Christopher C. Chang, M.D., Ph.D. – (Tuesday, February 12, 2013) –   Rice cereal first and then vegetables? What about fruit? I get these questions often from my patients. The timing of when to introduce solid foods to infants can be confusing for parents, and the recommendations can vary slightly from doctor to doctor.   The research is ongoing, but there is a growing body of evidence which suggest introducing solid foods early may increase tolerance and reduce incidence of allergies.  

five basic ideas (see also previous post featuring Dr. Burkitt): 1) more fiber (good quality bread, celery, apples, hot oatmeal, all leafy vegetables, berries) 2) less fat in particular less (or zero) animal fat 3) less (or zero) sugar 4) less salt 5) no processed foods   It’s not just about weight or looking good in jeans.  It’s about the whole enchillada from macro (planetary health) to micro (the bugs that co-exist with you your whole life in your tube).  Check out this brief excerpt from an upcoming book about the human biome and how drastically it has changed (due to poor diet) in the past 100 years: Forthcoming book by the folks at Human Food Project. Click Here if you would like to receive a notice when this book becomes available. So what should you eat to improve the diversity and possible resilience of your gut microbiome to reduce the risk to invading pathogens, unnecessary inflammation, leaky gut and so forth?  Nobody really knows for sure and the answer is likely different for different age groups and populations.  But at...