http://www.medscape.com/ http://www.medscape.com/ http://www.medscape.com/ Hot off the press new protocol for improving cognitive function and reversing many measurable parameters of  mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the precursor to early dementia and eventually Alzheimer’s, which until now has been considered an irreversible disease.  No drugs have worked.  The “new protocol” (book will be published in the spring, by Dr. Dale Bredesen) states that our brains make amyloid to PROTECT against toxic insults, which are the actual cause of decay of cognitive function.  Dr. Bredesen talks about 3 types of Alzheimer’s, which has been borne out by many meta-analyses. 

Grass-Fed Milk Is Taking Off With Health-Conscious Shoppers At Almost $6 a Half-Gallon at Whole Foods and Other Stores, Milk From Cows That Don’t Eat Grain Is Considered Healthier Than Organic By Sarah Nassauer For some shoppers, organic isn’t enough. They want grass-fed milk.  The pricey milk isn’t only organic. It comes from cows fed mostly grass, and never corn and soy.

Here’s a link to the article on NPR (http://n.pr/1lrRnq3   Given, the current agreement is, that there is 10 : 1 ratio of bacteria in our microbiome to cells in our body. There appears to be 10 times more viruses (bacteriophages) in the microbiome than bacteria. This is in terms of genetic material.   “In the 1920s and 1930s, before widespread use of antibiotics, physicians successfully treated a variety of infections with bacteriophages, or phages for short. These natural viral predators, which target bacteria but leave mammalian and plant cells unscathed, were sold by pharmaceutical companies including Eli Lilly & Company1 and even made it into the fiction of the time—the protagonist of Sinclair Lewis’ 1925 book Arrowsmith fought bubonic plague with phages.”   Globe-Trotting Virus Hides Inside People’s Gut Bacteria New viruses are a dime a dozen. Every few months, we hear about a newly discovered flu virus that’s jumped from birds to people somewhere in the world. And the number of viruses identified in bats is “extraordinary and appears to increase almost daily,” scientists wrote last year in the journal PLOS Pathogens. But a virus that has...

By MICHAEL MOSS Published: February 20, 2013   On the evening of April 8, 1999, a long line of Town Cars and taxis pulled up to the Minneapolis headquarters of Pillsbury and discharged 11 men who controlled America’s largest food companies. Nestlé was in attendance, as were Kraft and Nabisco, General Mills and Procter & Gamble, Coca-Cola and Mars. Rivals any other day, the C.E.O.’s and company presidents had come together for a rare, private meeting. On the agenda was one item: the emerging obesity epidemic and how to deal with it. While the atmosphere was cordial, the men assembled were hardly friends. Their stature was defined by their skill in fighting one another for what they called “stomach share” — the amount of digestive space that any one company’s brand can grab from the competition.       

Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – 6 Foods That Fight Pain – By Grandparents.com – (Friday, March 1, 2013) When you get out of bed in the morning do you make a sort of “oyyyyyyy…aaaagggh” groan that goes with an achy pain in your back and knees? Welcome to the world of getting older. (Your first impulse might be to take some ibuprofen. Recent studies, however, have shown a possible link between longterm-use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) and increased risk of heart disease and gastrointestinal bleeding–so talk to your doctor.)  What you can do right now is incorporate certain foods into your diet that have been shown to reduce pain and may take away some of that achy feeling.

The Huffington Post (huffingtonpost.com) – How Antioxidants Really Protect Against Stroke and Dementia – By Jaimie Dalessio – (Thursday, February 21, 2013) – The protective power of antioxidants against stroke and dementia may have less to do with your total dietary intake of antioxidants and more to do with the specific foods that contribute to your antioxidant level, new research suggests. Researchers from Harvard Medical School in Boston and Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam in the Netherlands analyzed health and dietary information on 5,395 people aged 55 and older who were part of the long-term Rotterdam Study of medical conditions and other factors in older adults.

Homo sapiens evolved in Africa as a hairless ape. That creature spent LOTS of time outside, with a prodigious amount of skin exposure in a nice sunny environment. Today homo sapiens is largely an indoor mammal, and typically covers up a good deal of skin when venturing outside. Often when in a relaxed stance, say on a beach vacation, gobs of sunscreen is applied. This all adds up to much less Vitamin D synthesis happening in the skin cells. Hairless ape was designed to receive a lot of Vitamin D. The sun emits both UV-A (responsible for most melanomas) and UV-B which does not penetrate clouds or through glass and is only “full strength” at mid-day. UV-B is the ray needed to synthesize Vit D, whereas UV-A is the “tanning” frequency in tanning salons and does not stimulate much Vit D production. People who are extremely deficient in Vitamin D (less than 12 ng/mL) will respond rapidly to real sun exposure, and serum levels rise quickly. People who are marginally deficient (between 30 and 50 ng/mL) achieve optimal levels (50-80...

Loss of height of one inch or more may be an indicator of a vertebral fracture.That means one of the 29 “backbones” forming the spine might have a crack or be slightly crushed.These vertebral fractures are much more common than one would think and vertebral fracture is emerging as an important indicator of osteoporosis. For many years it has been standard practice for doctors to recommend bone density evaluation (with “DEXA” scans, or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, a special type of X-ray) around menopause because estrogen is a potent bone-builder, and estrogen begins to wane at menopause, or even before menopause.According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 30 million American women (and 14 million American men) have osteoporosis today. This is a preventable disease, and if not prevented can seriously compromise quality of life, and, ultimately, longevity also.The DEXA scans measure bone density at several sites and give a standardized “score” to the bone density (called the T-score). A T-score of zero (0) is perfect.Anything below zero represents bone loss.A T-score of minus 1.5 (-1.5) means osteopenia (bone loss) and a T-score...

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