Inner Peace Reduces Anxiety 1. Be good to yourself. This is not selfish. It’s the foundation for a more peaceful world. 2. Breathe. Deep, slow breathing creates an ‘alpha’ state, which is an inwardly focused, relaxed, receptive awareness of reality. Allow the time daily for deep breathing and self-reflection. 3. Take care of your body. Move every day. Avoid alcohol, caffeine and junk food. Drink 1/4 your weight (pounds) in ounces of water daily. Always drink before eating, and never during meals. Choose vibrant, fresh, organic foods. 4. Honor your emotions. Acknowledge them, allow them, name them. Express them in a way that is not harmful to yourself or others. For example, write a letter or sing your pain instead of consuming sugar, alcohol or other drugs. 5. Create fun, loving relationships. Avoid judgment. 6. You get what you think about most. Think positively. Release negative emotions. Feel gratitude. Make a list of 5 reasons you feel grateful, every morning. Resources: www.HealthJourney.com www.BrainSync.com www.PathofLight.com Belleruth, Naparstek, “Meditation for Relaxation & Wellness” Burne, Rhonda, “The Secret” Hay, Louise L, “You Can...

ABNORMAL SLEEP PERIODS INCREASE CARDIOVASCULAR RISK: A study has shown that, even among healthy people, those who regularly get five hours or less sleep a night have more than double the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Also, people who regularly get nine or more hours of sleep a night have a greater than fifty percent increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Perhaps more surprising, people who get six or eight hours sleep also have a higher – but far less dramatic – increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The study advised that seven hours sleep per night, not six or eight or anything more extreme, was the ideal regular sleep period for cardiovascular health. But how could sleep period affect heart health? The researchers suggested that shorter sleep times can cause “impaired glucose tolerance, reduced insulin sensitivity, increased sympathetic [nerve] activity and elevated blood pressure, all of which increase the risk of hardening of the arteries. And longer sleep duration may be related to an underlying sleep-related breathing disorder or poor sleep quality. The study was published in the August 1, 2010...

VITAMIN D MAY BOOST HEART FAILURE SURVIVAL RATES: A study has found that heart failure patients with reduced levels of vitamin D have lower rates of survival than patients with normal vitamin D levels. As a result, researchers suggest that a low intake of vitamin D may be a factor in the development, and outcome, of heart failure. Vitamin D is produced by the skin when it is exposed to the natural ultra violet-B, or UV-B, radiation from the sun. Most tissues and cells have a vitamin D receptor; and evidence suggests vitamin D reduces the risks of several chronic illnesses such as common cancers, autoimmune diseases, kidney diseases, chronic infectious diseases, high blood pressure and apparently, heart failure. The study team described the evidence of a protective effect from vitamin D as “compelling,” and recommended that heart failure patients should be advised to take vitamin D supplements and eat oily fish or eggs. The study was presented August 31, 2010 at the annual congress of the European Society Cardiology. It has not yet been published in a peer-reviewed journal....

Q: Where can men over the age of 60 find younger, sexy women who are interested in them? A: Try a bookstore, under fiction. Q: What can a man do while his wife is going through menopause? A: Keep busy. If you’re handy with tools, you can finish the basement. When you’re done you’ll have a place to live.

I have posted previously about the myth that lowering cholesterol will prevent heart attacks and other cardiovascular disasters. I urge you to not “buy into” one of the biggest frauds perpetuated by Big Pharma. What is really sad is that most conventionally trained doctors feel forced to “cover their butts” and prescribe statins the minute total cholesterol levels go above the quite random number of 200.

Many of us have been incited to concern, even fear,  about cholesterol levels.  There has been an enormous media and medical push to reduce cholesterol levels in the past two decades. 

The adrenal glands are walnut sized, when healthy, and sit above the kidneys.  That’s what their name means: “Ad” is Latin for above and “Renal” means relating to kidneys.  The main secretion of the adrenal glands is adrenaline, also known as epinephrine.  Adrenaline has an extremely short half-life, which means it dissipates quickly in the bloodstream, so we really can’t measure your levels of adrenaline.  However, the adrenals also secrete cortisol (from the outer layer, or cortex, of the glands) which has a more prolonged effect, and can be measured. Adrenaline is the “fight and flight” neurotransmitter and causes numerous physical responses such as narrowed peripheral blood vessels, shunting blood to the internal vessels, such as in the big leg muscles and the heart and away from the digestive organs.  An adrenaline rush might feel like a strong shot of caffeine, or the heart-twanging scare of a near-miss on a busy highway. Humans evolved, for many thousands of years, in an environment much less cozy than what many of us enjoy today.  We were built to outwit and kill larger...

written for NDNR and published in May 2007 www.ndnr.com An egregiously sexy woman, is, by and large, a young and healthy woman.  A woman who has matured past reproductive utility may suffer from reduced libido (as all purveyors of aphrodisiacs will accuse) or she may simply have new preoccupations. 

written for NDNR (www.ndnr.com) and published Feb 2008 Heart disease is the leading cause of the death in the U.S. The World Health Organization estimates that 17.5 million people died of CVD in 2005, representing 30% of all global deaths. Of these, 7.6 million were due to coronary heart disease and 5.7 million were due to stroke. It is also a major cause of disability. The risk of heart disease increases as the population ages. A man over age 45 of a woman over age 55 has a greater risk of heart disease than younger folk. Another known risk factor is having a close family member who had heart disease at an early age. Heart disease kills six times more women than breast cancer (Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics 2006 Update. Dallas, Texas: American Heart Association; 2005) but only 30% of women (from a 1997 national survey) recognized CVD as a leading cause of death.  The Red Dress Campaign, kicked off in 2005, raised this awareness to 55% although disproportionately more of this increased awareness was in white or well...