MRSA is the scourge of hospitals, but now the discovery in France of a volcanic clay with miraculous healing properties raises the prospect of a cure for it, and to other dangerous superbugs (http://news.independent.co.uk/health/article3104663.) Scientists in England have discovered a new and highly effective weapon against deadly superbugs like the MRSA sweeping through dirty hospital wards green French muck. The dramatic antibiotic success of agricur, a clay made from ancient volcanic ash found in the mountains of central France, marks it out as a potential rival to penicillin, the wonder drug of the 20th century. In experiments, the clay killed up to 99 per cent of superbug colonies within 24 hours. Control samples of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) grew 45-fold in the same period. The clay has a similar effect on other deadly bacteria tested, including salmonella, E. coli, and a flesh-eating disease called buruli, a relative of leprosy which disfigures children across central and western Africa. Buruli has been classed as “an emerging public health threat” by the World Health Organization (WHO). MRSA is also a growing concern. Since...

There’s a new wave in testing people for a so-called “body burden” of industrial chemicals in their blood stream.  The results are shocking.  A family with two young children in Oakland, CA

A new study published in the October 2007 Lancet (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science) by researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, concludes that influenza vaccinations in the US have prevented fewer deaths

New Research on Ginseng: Pharmacogenomics and the Yin/Yang actions of ginseng: anti-tumor, angiomodulating and steroid-like activities of ginsenosides.  Chinese Medicine 2007 Long known as a whole-body tonic (the root plant, precious for centuries in Asian countries, is shaped like a person) new evidence validates and explains some of ginseng’s healing actions. In Chinese medicine, ginseng (Panax ginseng) has long been used as a general tonic or an adaptogen to promote longevity and enhance bodily functions. It has also been claimed to be effective in combating stress, fatigue, oxidants, cancer and diabetes mellitus. Most previous studies have claimed that the pharmacological effects of ginseng are attributed to its bioactive constituents such as ginsenosides, saponins, phytosterols, peptides, polysaccharides, fatty acids, polyacetylenes, vitamins and minerals.  In this new research, the focus was the recent advances in the studies of ginsenosides on the formation of blood vessels, which is a common denominator of many diseases, such as cancer and some cardiovascular disorders. Specifically, the root has been shown to inhibit new blood vessel growth in rapidly growing tissue: that is, tumors.  The medical term...

The American College of Sports Medicine and the American Heart Association have released new guidelines for physical activity that recommend that healthy adults ages 18 to 65 exercise a minimum of five days per week in order to promote health and prevent disease.

On October 2 the citizens of Juneau, Alaska voted to keep sodium fluoride OUT of our pure, glacial-melt water. It was a landslide victory (4800 to 1900). Yay! Sodium fluoride is not as bad as hydrofluorosilicate, but it’s still a waste product from the phosphate fertilizer industry. www.fluoridealert.org

From The Juneau Empire, October 3, 2007 by Amanda Fehd Juneau says no to fluoride – Proposition fails 61 to 37 percent Juneau’s voters delivered a resounding “no” to fluoridating the city’s water supplies on Tuesday, putting an end, for now, to one of the most hotly contested and expensive ballot initiatives in the city’s history Preliminary vote counts showed Proposition 2 failed 61 to 37 percent. Of 24,613 registered voters, 7,820 voted at the polls. Another 1,500 absentee ballots and 600 questioned ballots remain to be counted. The Juneau city clerk’s office plans to certify the final count by next Tuesday.

Loss of height of one inch or more may be an indicator of a vertebral fracture.That means one of the 29 “backbones” forming the spine might have a crack or be slightly crushed.These vertebral fractures are much more common than one would think and vertebral fracture is emerging as an important indicator of osteoporosis. For many years it has been standard practice for doctors to recommend bone density evaluation (with “DEXA” scans, or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, a special type of X-ray) around menopause because estrogen is a potent bone-builder, and estrogen begins to wane at menopause, or even before menopause.According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, 30 million American women (and 14 million American men) have osteoporosis today. This is a preventable disease, and if not prevented can seriously compromise quality of life, and, ultimately, longevity also.The DEXA scans measure bone density at several sites and give a standardized “score” to the bone density (called the T-score). A T-score of zero (0) is perfect.Anything below zero represents bone loss.A T-score of minus 1.5 (-1.5) means osteopenia (bone loss) and a T-score...

“Stress” produces very real physical, mental and emotional changes, which are cummulative. Severe stress can cause permanent damage. So, it’s certainly a good investment in your health to reduce stress. A major stress chemical is cortisol, which is produced by the outer “cortex” of the adrenal gland.

It is said that Cleopatra bathed in milk, honey, and essential oils followed by gentle abrasion with fine white sand. How did we get from such a wholesome and luxurious cleansing ritual to today’s bar soaps that bubble with toxic and irritating substances, including petroleum-based ingredients? I don’t know, I just can’t picture Cleopatra cleaning herself with crude oil. Find out here what to look for on bar soap labels to ensure safe and soothing suds. While ancient Egyptian-style peeled grapes and bare-chested men with palm fronds might make a positive contribution to our beauty routines, toxic and irritating bar soaps most certainly don’t. Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic (FD&C) Act, personal care products and their ingredients are not required to undergo approval before they are sold to the public. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has banned 11 ingredients—meanwhile the European Union has made a list of 1,100 ingredients deemed too hazardous for use in personal care products. It has become the American consumer’s responsibility to read the labels: to make sense of the gobbledygook listed there...