Q: I’m not sure I am absorbing my nutrition.  I try to eat well; no alcohol, sodas or fried food.  Despite that I continue to gain weight, become hypoglycemic easily, have low energy and sometimes break out in hives.  My bowel function is all over the place.  Please tell me what I’m doing wrong — I have spent thousands of dollars on doctors already! A: Sounds like you may have “Irritable Bowel Syndrome” or IBS.

Are you jittery, distractable or disorganized? Do you lose your keys a lot? Do you get excited or depressed easily? These symptoms, in moderation, may be part of normal life – but they could spell a syndrome not limited to children: Attention Deficit Disorder.

Safer and healthier than bleach, and very inexpensive at any drugstore. 1. Take one capful and hold in your mouth to 10 minutes daily, then spit it out.  No more canker sores, and your teeth will be whiter without expensive pastes.  Use it instead of mouthwash. 2. Let your toothbrushes soak in a cup of peroxide to keep them free of germs. 3. Clean your counters and table tops with peroxide to kill germs and leave a fresh smell.  Simply put a little on your dishrag when you wipe, or spray it on the counters. 4. After rinsing your wooden cutting board, pour peroxide on it to kill bacteria such as salmonella. 5. Treat foot fungus by spraying a 50:50 mixture of peroxide and water on them (especially the toes) every night and let dry. 6. Soak any infections or cuts in 3% (USP) peroxide for 5-10 minutes several times daily. This can heal gangrene. 7. Fill a spray bottle with a 50:50 mixture of peroxide and water and keep it in every bathroom to disinfect without harming your septic...

Wheat seems to be the most “irritating” of the gluten-containing grains, and some folks are only wheat sensitive, without having the full-blown problem of gluten intolerance.  Total gluten sensitivity (celiac disease, or celiac “sprue”) has many faces, and the most well-known are various forms of gastro-intestinal distress:  usually diarrhea, but occasionally constipation, oral or gastric ulcers, a shiny raw-feeling tongue (glossitis), nausea after eating, and even vomiting.  General symptoms can includes “malaise” which mean feeling unwell, also weakness, unexplained weight loss, failure to grow (in children) and blunting of the fingertips (clubbing).  The skin can become itchy, or develop lots of tiny capillary breaks, and herpes-like blisters may occur, often in the mouth. Vitamin deficiencies are common with celiac disease: especially the B vitamins (lack of which cause an easy stress response, and tingling, then numbing of the extremities), and also the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K can be in short supply.  Bone density can be reduced because celiac disease causes calcium malabsorption.  What is going on in true celiac disease is that part of the gluten molecule...

1. Regular relaxation for body and mind.  Take relaxation breaks.  Learn to value and enjoy doing nothing.  Find a technique that works for you and practice it regularly.

Many of us have been incited to concern, even fear,  about cholesterol levels.  There has been an enormous media and medical push to reduce cholesterol levels in the past two decades. 

The adrenal glands are walnut sized, when healthy, and sit above the kidneys.  That’s what their name means: “Ad” is Latin for above and “Renal” means relating to kidneys.  The main secretion of the adrenal glands is adrenaline, also known as epinephrine.  Adrenaline has an extremely short half-life, which means it dissipates quickly in the bloodstream, so we really can’t measure your levels of adrenaline.  However, the adrenals also secrete cortisol (from the outer layer, or cortex, of the glands) which has a more prolonged effect, and can be measured. Adrenaline is the “fight and flight” neurotransmitter and causes numerous physical responses such as narrowed peripheral blood vessels, shunting blood to the internal vessels, such as in the big leg muscles and the heart and away from the digestive organs.  An adrenaline rush might feel like a strong shot of caffeine, or the heart-twanging scare of a near-miss on a busy highway. Humans evolved, for many thousands of years, in an environment much less cozy than what many of us enjoy today.  We were built to outwit and kill larger...

There are 2 main types of anemia — iron deficiency, where the red blood cells are too small to “magnetize” sufficient oxygen to the cells, and so-called pernicious anemia, where the red blood cells are too big to fit through the capillaries, our tiniest blood vessels.  Iron-deficiency anemia is more common, particularly in younger people.  If you are a woman with iron-deficiency anemia, I would suspect you have heavy periods, which is a major source of chronic blood loss for women.  If you have iron-deficiency anemia but do not have heavy menstrual periods, you need to get a work-up to figure out where the bleeding is coming from: start by checking your urine and stool for microscopic amounts of blood (any ND or other healthcare provider in your area can help you with this). Tannins bind iron, so if you like to drink tea, especially black tea, make sure you do not take your iron supplements or iron containing foods within 2 hours of drinking black tea.  Meat and seafoods are the best dietary sources of iron.  If you prefer...

written for NDNR and published in May 2007 www.ndnr.com An egregiously sexy woman, is, by and large, a young and healthy woman.  A woman who has matured past reproductive utility may suffer from reduced libido (as all purveyors of aphrodisiacs will accuse) or she may simply have new preoccupations. 

written for NDNR (www.ndnr.com) and published Feb 2008 Heart disease is the leading cause of the death in the U.S. The World Health Organization estimates that 17.5 million people died of CVD in 2005, representing 30% of all global deaths. Of these, 7.6 million were due to coronary heart disease and 5.7 million were due to stroke. It is also a major cause of disability. The risk of heart disease increases as the population ages. A man over age 45 of a woman over age 55 has a greater risk of heart disease than younger folk. Another known risk factor is having a close family member who had heart disease at an early age. Heart disease kills six times more women than breast cancer (Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics 2006 Update. Dallas, Texas: American Heart Association; 2005) but only 30% of women (from a 1997 national survey) recognized CVD as a leading cause of death.  The Red Dress Campaign, kicked off in 2005, raised this awareness to 55% although disproportionately more of this increased awareness was in white or well...